THE CASE FOR SCHOOL INTEGRATION

In 1954, the Supreme Court found that racial segregation is a major driver of educational inequity. When Boston refused to integrate public schools, black women from Roxbury and white suburban residents teamed up to create a new way. That’s why METCO was founded.

Racial segregation persists. Like most cities, Boston has been resegregating since the 1980s and is now more divided than ever.

That means METCO is more important than ever.

An analysis by the Boston Globe in August 2018 showed that 60% of Boston schools are 90% students of color—up from 42% twenty years ago.

INTEGRATION BENEFITS EVERYONE.

STUDENTS
SCHOOLS
SUBURBAN COMMUNITIES
STUDENTS
Academic success
  • Critical thinking
  • Problem-solving
  • Self-confidence
  • Richer learning environment
Cross-cultural knowledge and empathy
  • Reducing prejudice
  • Encouraging cross-racial friendships
  • Likelihood of living in diverse neighborhoods later in life
Preparation for employment in the global economy 96% of major employers say it is “important” that employees be “comfortable working with colleagues, customers, and/or clients from diverse cultural backgrounds.”
Increased civic engagement Participation in community activities
SCHOOLS

Builds support in suburban districts for:

  • Inclusive school climate
  • Culturally responsive curriculum
  • Equitable conduct policies
  • Equitable academic policies
  • Faculty diversity
SUBURBAN COMMUNITIES

Normalizes and celebrates diversity, paving the way for investment in more equitable housing, policing, and economic policies

ARTICLES & RESEARCH

THE NATIONAL COALITION ON SCHOOL DIVERSITY (2018): Re-Weaving the Social Fabric Through Integrated Schools